Finding words in Letterpress

November 1st, 2012 | No Comments »

Letterpress is my latest game addiction, and I’m not alone. YOU’RE ALL ADDICTS because it’s damn fun. Let’s talk about how to play it.

This is a game about building words and placing them in the best spot possible. While having a great vocabulary is obviously beneficial, building words through combinations is the way.

Here’s what I do. An example from a game with @gretared…

You get 25 letters. Some boards offer a ton of combinations, allowing a lot of fluidity. Some games are brutal.

It’s all about the vowels.

 

The first thing I do in any game is to compare vowels vs consonants by tapping all the vowels. This shows how rough the board may be.

Only three vowels means this game will be a slug fest and these three letters will be played all the time. So the best strategy is to secure them against your enemy.

 

And don’t forget Y.
 

Next I’ll check out the corners to see if I can build an empire there with a single word. Ahh, here NOTE is just screaming to be played.
 

Recognizing anagrams gives you tremendous flexibility.

NOTE is also TONE.

VOTE is VETO.

DEAL LEAD DALE.

PALE LEAP PLEA.

 

But the real trick to this game?

Build words backwards.

Start at the end and work your way back.

Suffixes increase combinations. Almost any basic word can become a longer word with suffixes.

ES ED LY IVE AVE ING INGS EST IEST and so on.

 

Or look for common word endings ATE ARE ITE INE or my favorite TION. Make combinations with the endings above
 

Look for doubles that commonly appear together.

PP TT NN ZZ MM SS BB DD LL.

 

What typically comes before LLY? ILLY ALLY.

Now that you have a solid ending with some length, what can go in front of it?

 

So by starting backwards with a common ending and then seeing what can be placed in front of it, we get a ten-letter word which will do just fine.
 

And keep trying multiple combinations. Suppose you came up with a good ending in ATES.
 

And notice that you can make it GRATES. Never be satisfied with your first idea.
 

Because if you try something else, you may notice a better position to play, like the C in CRATES which gives you a corner you may be able to defend later.
 

So there you go. Don’t rely on just your vocabulary. Think in combinations.



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